NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY

CASE STUDY

LOCATION: Boulder, CO
PROJECT: MEMS Research Facility

But aside from investing in new equipment, NIST also needed a clean space to house it in. Thus, the organization sought out the expertise of CES to design, construct, and certify an expansion of the MEMS Research Facility. Because of our experience in completing similar projects for other high-profile clients, NIST was eager to begin the MEMS furnace project and realize its goals.

Project Challenge

The area selected for NIST’s MEMS Research Facility expansion was located within a concrete structure erected in the 1940s. CES relied on our expertise in designing and constructing countless enclosed spaces to correctly complete the partial design started by SDR. We were also expected to demolish the existing rooms and equipment within that area, as well as the structural roof supports for the HVAC equipment – all within the timeline designated by NIST.

Results

Promptly, CES successfully completed NIST’s MEMS furnace project by installing and certifying approximately 2,000 square feet of Class 100 cleanrooms. Each cleanroom featured fume hood workstations that ensured the MEMS Research Facility would deliver as a dependable enclosure for the institution.

We also installed a FabLine Wall System, which is designed to provide flexibility in adapting to the constantly changing market lifecycles and product development involved with manufacturing precision micro-electronics. In addition to the FabLine Wall System, we utilized re-circulating air handlers from Clean-Pak to supply the necessary distribution air for each cleanroom. Lastly, the Huntair plenum-style gel ceiling system was installed to support the fans’ ability to distribute the air, as well as make field labor more efficient. It all adds up to an expansion to the MEMS Research Facility that NIST can rely on for years to come.

Design Parameters

– Cleanliness: ISO 5 (Class 100)

– Enclosure Size: Approximately 2,000 square feet

Background

Located in Boulder, Colorado, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) sought to expand its research and manufacturing abilities. To do so, the organization purchased a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) furnace, a complex design that utilizes microscopic mechanical and electro-mechanical technological elements.